From the monthly archives: "June 2014"

Driftwood

Today’s Photo: Driftwood

One afternoon while we were visiting St. Andrews State Park in Panama City Beach, I decided to take a stroll from the ocean to the northern point of the park along the beach for the bay.  I found many interesting things, but was fascinated with this piece of driftwood.  I found several logs, but nothing other than this that was man made, or processed.  I know that the ocean holds many mysteries and transports things you would never believe, but I was impressed that this beach was so clear of garbage.

The Easy Footpath

Today’s Photo: The Easy Footpath

Several weeks ago, I hiked the Appalachian Trail from Forest Service Road 42 to Springer Mountain and then the Appalachian Approach Trail to Amicalola Falls State Park.  What is billed at about 8.5 miles was actually right at 10 miles to the lodge at the park.  Going from north to south was not nearly as bad as I can imagine going to opposite direction would have been.

The Window to Wonderland

Today’s Photo:  The Window to Wonderland

As winters go, this last one was pretty good for North Georgia.  That’s how I see it at least.  We had two really good winter storms and I got to spend sometime tromping around in the snow.  As hot and muggy as it is right now, I wish this was my view.  I can honestly saw that I don’t dream much of warmer weather when it’s cold.

Mountain Cascade

Today’s Photo: Mountain Cascade

I found this little cascade while exploring in North Georgia not too long ago.  I was drawn to the constant action f the water flowing down the hill.

Pink Tulip

Today’s Photo: Pink Tulip

This was another shot I got from the Smith Gilbert Gardens.  I was walking around and ran across this small bed of tulips that were beginning to bloom.  I thought having all the other tulips in the background made for a good photo.

Mt. Sterling (Great Smoky Mountains National Park)

Today’s Photo: Mt. Sterling (Great Smoky Mountains National Park)

This shot is from the top of the fire tower on Mount Sterling in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park looking east over North Carolina.  The day before this, I hiked just over 6 miles and gained over 4000 feet of elevation in that time, carrying all my camera gear and camping gear.  What a climb, but well worth it for views and a sunrise like this.  I almost did not get out of the hammock, as it was so cozy.  Fortunately I did.

Savannah City Hall

Today’s Photo: Savannah City Hall

I took off one evening after walking around River Street and made my way through several of the parks just beyond Bay Street.  I went through Johnson Square and found this angle to shoot City Hall.  Traffic was not real heavy, but timed just right that it took forever to get this shot without cars on Bull Street.

Black and Veil

Today’s Photo: Black and Veil

I found this little cascade along the creek running from the bottom of Amicalola Falls.  I was attracted to the curtain of water that it created as it slid over the edge of the large rock.  If the wind had not been so chilly, I may have tried to crawl under the water.

Alter Candles

Today’s Photo: Alter Candles

Although not Catholic, during a recent trip to Savannah, I made a stop at the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist.  I am always impressed by the massiveness once you enter the church.  Unfortunately, it was so busy that I did not get all the photos that I desired, but I was not left image-less.  I took this of one bank of prayer candles in front of the statue of a crucified Jesus.  It made for a good detail photo despite the large crowds in the cathedral.

Fort Pulaski

Today’s Photo: Fort Pulaski

It has been a while since I visited a Civil War park and this is a continue of my Silent Guns of the South series.

Built in the early 1800’s and finished in 1847, this fortification has a long history.  It was named after Count Casmir Pulaski and, at one point, commanded by Robert E. Lee before the beginning of the Civil War.  During his command, Lee commented that the fort was impenetrable.  However, that was to be proven wrong years later during an assault by Union soldiers using rifled cannons.  After a 30 hour assault, Confederate commander, Col. Olmstead, surrendered the fort.

This shot is from the rear of the fort and the demilune.  During the Civil War, this was flat with a surrounding parapet and held different support buildings.  Between the demilune and the fort, is another portion of the moat.

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